Programs

CAJP 2018 – 2019 Program Schedule

Lectures:

I’ll Build A Stairway To Paradise

A Lecture by Russell Holmes, Friday, September 21, 2018, 7:30pm

St. James Episcopal Church, 1018 Farmington Ave, West Hartford, CT 06107

Lecture Fee $15 ($8 Students)

The drama of longing and searching for the unitary reality which is the alpha and omega of all creation—in the functional interplay of all the opposites—rests on the  shoulders of Adam and Eve and characters like them in the mythologies of the world.

In his presentation, Russell Holmes will consider the classic expression in the drama in the theology and art of St. Augustine (The City of God), Dante Alighieri (The Divine Comedy) and John Milton (Paradise Lost) and in mandala symbolism. Reference will be made to unconscious material representing current expressions of the drama.

Russell Holmes, IAAP, is a Jungian Analyst, a graduate of the C. G. Jung Institute Zurich, and a member of the New England Society of Jungian Analyst and the International Association of Analytical Psychology.  He is retired from private practice and resides in Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts.

 


You Should All Become Christs: How to Live the Divine in a Postmodern World

A Lecture by Diane Croft, Friday, November 16, 2018, 7:30 pm

St. James Episcopal Church, 1018 Farmington Ave, West Hartford, CT 06107

Lecture Fee $15 ($8 Students)

Jung believed that the activation of archetypal images in the collective unconscious served two purposes: to educate the “spirit of the age” and to compensate the one-sidedness of the present situation. What is being activated in the collective unconscious of the postmodern era and what does it tell us? In this presentation, Diane Croft will share archetypal imprints from her own numinous encounter with the spirit of the depths, as a woman living in the 21st century, and elucidate how these living images point toward a new era of consciousness aptly described by Jung: “The time has come when each must do his [her] own work of redemption. You should all become Christs.”

 

What They Saw in the Vessel:

Making Sense of the “Nonsense” of Alchemy

A Lecture by Diane Croft,  Saturday, November 17, 2018, 9:30am-Noon

St. James Episcopal Church, 1018 Farmington Ave, West Hartford, CT 06107

Lecture Fee $15 ($8 Students)

Jung abruptly stopped work on the Red Book to pursue alchemy, which he saw as a mirror image of the individuation process. “The experiences of the alchemists were, in a sense, my experiences, and their world was my world,” he wrote in Psychology and Alchemy. What was it that he saw? What the alchemists called the Philosopher’s Stone, Jung thought of as the Self. In this presentation, Diane Croft will show how she got “cooked” in the alchemical vessel in the same way the alchemists described the transformative operation centuries ago. She will bring life and currency to a psychological process that is not about changing a person into someone else; it’s about bringing something out in a person that has been there all along.

Diane Croft, M.Ed.,is a graduate of Wittenberg and Harvard University. She spent most of her career as a publisher at National Braille Press in Boston, MA. For three years, Diane had access to a hidden, animated realm, described by C.G. Jung as “the collective unconscious,” which she describes in her book The Unseen Partner: Love & Longing in the Unconscious. A recent review in Quadrant described it as comparable to Jung’s Red Book but easier to understand.

 


 

The Ego’s Task in Today’s World

A Lecture by Cynthia Swartz, Friday, March 22, 2019, 7:30pm

St. James Episcopal Church, 1018 Farmington Ave, West Hartford, CT 06107

 Lecture Fee $15 ($8 Students)

What is going on? The national and international news stirs up confusion and instability lying within.  I will continue the theme from my last talk entitled Job: The First Ego.  Healthy ego development begins with identification with one side of a dichotomy: me vs not me, good vs bad.  Jung shows, in individual and historical examples, how this necessary identification with one side leads sooner or later to activation of the opposite. This presentation will begin with a brief review of ego development and Jung’s understanding of the role of ego consciousness in modern times as a framework for a group discussion exploring how a developed ego receives and responds to the psyche inside and in outer collective current events.

Cynthia Swartz, MD is a child, adolescent, and adult psychiatrist working in northern Vermont in a community hospital and in community health clinics.  Prior to going to medical school she attended the Analyst Training Program at the C.G. Jung Institute-Boston, and has continued her independent study of Jungian psychology.  She holds a Master’s degree in Organ Performance from Indiana University School of Music and currently studies violin and plays in local orchestras.

 


The Meaning of The Red Book Today

Lectures by J. Gary Sparks and James Scherer

Friday, May 10, 2019, 7:30pm; and Saturday, May 11, 2019, 9:30am-Noon

St. James Episcopal Church, 1018 Farmington Ave, West Hartford, CT 06107

Lecture Fee $15 ($8 Students)

In his Red Book, Carl Jung explored “the spirit of the depths” throughout the years of World War One.  The psychological material that he faced during that time showed clearly the forces that were erupting on the Continent as the storm of war’s devastation shattered Europe.  In this lecture and workshop, Gary and Jim will investigate how the imagery Jung found in the collective unconscious one hundred years ago is still with us today.  From Jung’s record of his ordeal, then, how can we now gain insight into the forces–hidden from the collective view–that are shaping the travesty of our own time?  Where is the road to healing? With the help of recent dreams from people in analysis, we will observe how the self is equally concerned with the transformation of the darkness visible today as it was for Jung at the beginning of the First World War.

J. Gary Sparks holds a Diploma in Analytical Psychology from the C.G.Jung Institute, Zurich, and has maintained an analytical practice in Indianapolis since 1983.  He is the author of At the Heart of Matter, Valley of Diamonds, and Carl Jung and Arnold Toynbee:  The Social Meaning of Inner Work, all three published by Inner City Books.  In his spare time he likes biking, trying to speak French, and cooking with garlic.  He has been a frequent presenter to the CAJP, and always enjoys his visits in Connecticut.

James Scherer is a graduate of the C. G. Jung Institute, Zurich, with a Diploma in Analytical Psychology.  He lives in Hartford where he has practiced as an analyst since 1986.  During these years he has offered continuing Saturday seminars and occasional lectures.

Seminars:

A Study of C.G. Jung’s The Red Book

Fall Seminar 2017: Sept. 30,  Oct. 7,  21,  28,  Nov. 4, 11, 25
Winter Seminar 2018: Jan. 6, 13, 20, 27,  Feb. 3, 10, 17
Spring Seminar 2018: March 24, 31, April 7, 14, 21, 28,  May 5
 Saturday Mornings: 9:30 — 12 Noon
St. John’s Episcopal Church, 679 Farmington Avenue, West Hartford, CT 06119
Seminar Fee: $250. Advance Registration Required; contact info@jungct.org or call 860-948-9445

 

From his Collective Works, we experience C.G. Jung primarily as a doctor, a physician, a psychiatrist, a psychologist, and last but not least a student of the human history of religious ideas. In The Red Book, we experience a different Jung.  Here we experience Jung as his own patient, as the person suffering under inexplicable and irrational forces originating from within himself, from the depths of his own psyche.  We  also witness his attempt to understand what these experiences were asking of him.  He faithfully recorded his conversations with Elijah, Salome, and Philemon – a threesome who were repeatedly critical of Jung with respect to his limited understanding of the nature of God and love. Jung consequently lost himself just as he previously had understood himself. But this confusion seemed to have a hidden goal for it resulted in Jung’s meeting the primitive giant Izdubar, who was  searching for the place on the earth where the sun lands when it goes down at night.  Of course there is no such “place.” But the love that developed between them as they attempted to bridge both the historical and intellectual eternities that separated them, became the stone at the center of Jung’s psychology and his Red Book. It is an image for the transcendent mystery within the human psyche that impels us, consciously or unconsciously, towards the mystery of wholeness.

James Scherer is a graduate of the C. G. Jung Institute, Zurich, with a Diploma in Analytical Psychology.  He lives in Hartford where he has practiced as an analyst since 1986.  During these years he has offered continuing Saturday seminars and occasional lectures.