Connecticut Association for Jungian Psychology

Welcome to the new website for the Connecticut Association for Jungian Psychology. Our new website features an event calendar which you can search for events, subscribe to updates and easily add events to your calendar.

A nonprofit organization since 1981, CAJP exists in order to provide an opportunity for lectures, study, and discussion of the work of the Swiss psychologist C. G. Jung. CAJP is dedicated to making the methods and insights of Jung more widely available to individuals and professional groups through a program of extended education.

Mar
17
Tue
The Weavings of Odysseus: A Psychological Exploration of Homer’s Odyssey: A 6 week series requiring pre-registration @ Church of Christ, Scientist Church of Christ, Scientist 49 Park Street - Guilford
Mar 17 @ 10:00 am – Apr 21 @ 11:30 am
Homer’s Odyssey: The perils of the journey home
 
       The experience of the warrior is one known and experienced by many of those in our community. Many of our young men and women find themselves in a war that is rarely of their own making. When the war ends, these heroic fighters must return home, unlearning the life of the warrior and re-membering themselves so that they may each re-enter society and return to their home , their community, and their role as husband or wife, father or mother, son or daughter and so much more. They must  re-enter a community that is little changed while each returning warrior has been deeply changed by the experiences of war.
Those of us who have never experienced the horrors of war struggle to imagine what these brave souls have endured in their time away from home. And yet, for thousands of years, likely from the earliest times in human history, battles have been fought, soldiers and civilians have perished, and when each war ends, the warrior must return home, both geographically and metaphorically to an inner place of solace. One’s true home. But how is one to do that? How can one truly come home again? The return is circuitous, it is complicated, filled with distractions and challenges. While there is of course no easy way to explore such a complex topic, the Odyssey of Homer gives us an enduring legacy of advice on just this problem.
In this program, we will focus on the journey of Odysseus as he winds his way home to his beloved Ithaka after the Trojan War. It takes him 10 long years with many distractions along the way. There are lessons to be learned on each island. Ultimately, the hero will be tested many times in many different ways. By sex and drugs, and many of the same distractions that call to the returning warriors of our times. Join us as we explore the deeper psychological implications of this journey home. It is not necessary for participants to have read the work. The course will be taught using many paintings of the subject and I will tell the story as we go along. Join us as we work through this journey of transformation together and explore the psychological resonances found in this remarkable epic.
Please pre-register by submitting this form and letting us know of your interest!:

Mar
24
Tue
The Weavings of Odysseus: A Psychological Exploration of Homer’s Odyssey: A 6 week series requiring pre-registration @ Church of Christ, Scientist Church of Christ, Scientist 49 Park Street - Guilford
Mar 24 @ 10:00 am – Apr 28 @ 11:30 am
Homer’s Odyssey: The perils of the journey home
 
       The experience of the warrior is one known and experienced by many of those in our community. Many of our young men and women find themselves in a war that is rarely of their own making. When the war ends, these heroic fighters must return home, unlearning the life of the warrior and re-membering themselves so that they may each re-enter society and return to their home , their community, and their role as husband or wife, father or mother, son or daughter and so much more. They must  re-enter a community that is little changed while each returning warrior has been deeply changed by the experiences of war.
Those of us who have never experienced the horrors of war struggle to imagine what these brave souls have endured in their time away from home. And yet, for thousands of years, likely from the earliest times in human history, battles have been fought, soldiers and civilians have perished, and when each war ends, the warrior must return home, both geographically and metaphorically to an inner place of solace. One’s true home. But how is one to do that? How can one truly come home again? The return is circuitous, it is complicated, filled with distractions and challenges. While there is of course no easy way to explore such a complex topic, the Odyssey of Homer gives us an enduring legacy of advice on just this problem.
In this program, we will focus on the journey of Odysseus as he winds his way home to his beloved Ithaka after the Trojan War. It takes him 10 long years with many distractions along the way. There are lessons to be learned on each island. Ultimately, the hero will be tested many times in many different ways. By sex and drugs, and many of the same distractions that call to the returning warriors of our times. Join us as we explore the deeper psychological implications of this journey home. It is not necessary for participants to have read the work. The course will be taught using many paintings of the subject and I will tell the story as we go along. Join us as we work through this journey of transformation together and explore the psychological resonances found in this remarkable epic.
Please pre-register by submitting this form and letting us know of your interest!:

Mar
31
Tue
The Weavings of Odysseus: A Psychological Exploration of Homer’s Odyssey: A 6 week series requiring pre-registration @ Church of Christ, Scientist Church of Christ, Scientist 49 Park Street - Guilford
Mar 31 @ 10:00 am – May 5 @ 11:30 am
Homer’s Odyssey: The perils of the journey home
 
       The experience of the warrior is one known and experienced by many of those in our community. Many of our young men and women find themselves in a war that is rarely of their own making. When the war ends, these heroic fighters must return home, unlearning the life of the warrior and re-membering themselves so that they may each re-enter society and return to their home , their community, and their role as husband or wife, father or mother, son or daughter and so much more. They must  re-enter a community that is little changed while each returning warrior has been deeply changed by the experiences of war.
Those of us who have never experienced the horrors of war struggle to imagine what these brave souls have endured in their time away from home. And yet, for thousands of years, likely from the earliest times in human history, battles have been fought, soldiers and civilians have perished, and when each war ends, the warrior must return home, both geographically and metaphorically to an inner place of solace. One’s true home. But how is one to do that? How can one truly come home again? The return is circuitous, it is complicated, filled with distractions and challenges. While there is of course no easy way to explore such a complex topic, the Odyssey of Homer gives us an enduring legacy of advice on just this problem.
In this program, we will focus on the journey of Odysseus as he winds his way home to his beloved Ithaka after the Trojan War. It takes him 10 long years with many distractions along the way. There are lessons to be learned on each island. Ultimately, the hero will be tested many times in many different ways. By sex and drugs, and many of the same distractions that call to the returning warriors of our times. Join us as we explore the deeper psychological implications of this journey home. It is not necessary for participants to have read the work. The course will be taught using many paintings of the subject and I will tell the story as we go along. Join us as we work through this journey of transformation together and explore the psychological resonances found in this remarkable epic.
Please pre-register by submitting this form and letting us know of your interest!:

Apr
7
Tue
The Weavings of Odysseus: A Psychological Exploration of Homer’s Odyssey: A 6 week series requiring pre-registration @ Church of Christ, Scientist Church of Christ, Scientist 49 Park Street - Guilford
Apr 7 @ 10:00 am – May 12 @ 11:30 am
Homer’s Odyssey: The perils of the journey home
 
       The experience of the warrior is one known and experienced by many of those in our community. Many of our young men and women find themselves in a war that is rarely of their own making. When the war ends, these heroic fighters must return home, unlearning the life of the warrior and re-membering themselves so that they may each re-enter society and return to their home , their community, and their role as husband or wife, father or mother, son or daughter and so much more. They must  re-enter a community that is little changed while each returning warrior has been deeply changed by the experiences of war.
Those of us who have never experienced the horrors of war struggle to imagine what these brave souls have endured in their time away from home. And yet, for thousands of years, likely from the earliest times in human history, battles have been fought, soldiers and civilians have perished, and when each war ends, the warrior must return home, both geographically and metaphorically to an inner place of solace. One’s true home. But how is one to do that? How can one truly come home again? The return is circuitous, it is complicated, filled with distractions and challenges. While there is of course no easy way to explore such a complex topic, the Odyssey of Homer gives us an enduring legacy of advice on just this problem.
In this program, we will focus on the journey of Odysseus as he winds his way home to his beloved Ithaka after the Trojan War. It takes him 10 long years with many distractions along the way. There are lessons to be learned on each island. Ultimately, the hero will be tested many times in many different ways. By sex and drugs, and many of the same distractions that call to the returning warriors of our times. Join us as we explore the deeper psychological implications of this journey home. It is not necessary for participants to have read the work. The course will be taught using many paintings of the subject and I will tell the story as we go along. Join us as we work through this journey of transformation together and explore the psychological resonances found in this remarkable epic.
Please pre-register by submitting this form and letting us know of your interest!:

Apr
20
Mon
Jungian Reading Seminar: Psychological Types, Vol 6 CW @ Temenos Institute, Westport, CT
Apr 20 @ 11:30 am – 1:00 pm

For the Winter session, the Jungian Reading Group will continue reading Two Essays on Analytical Psychology,

CW vol 7. 

 

Joseph P. Wagenseller, D. Min., N.C. PsyA., L.P.C., L.P. is a Jungian Analyst in private practice in Westport, CT, having practiced for 37 years in Manhattan. He is the Founder and Executive Director of the Temenos Institute, now celebrating its 38th year in Westport and is the past President of the C.G. Jung Institute of New York. Currently he is the Chair of the Board of Trustees of the American Board for the Accreditation of Psychoanalysis. Additionally, Dr. Wagenseller is an Associate Professor in the Graduate Department of Clinical Psychology, Teachers College, Columbia University. He is the author of “The Archetype of Vocation,” in Protestantism and Jungian Analysis, “Spiritual Renewal at the Midlife from a Jungian Perspective”, Journal of Religion and Health (Vol. 37, No 3) and “Individuation, Jung’s Psychological Equivalent of a Spiritual Journey” in the Oxford Handbook of Psychology and Spirituality, ed. Lisa Miller, Ph.D., Oxford University Press, Inc., 2012.

Apr
24
Fri
LECTURE: THE “WAKE UP CALL”; OR C.G. JUNG’S CALL OF THE SELF @ Temenos Institute
Apr 24 @ 8:00 pm – 9:15 pm

LECTURE: THE “WAKE UP CALL”; OR C.G. JUNG’S CALL OF THE SELF

Joseph P. Wagenseller, D. Min., L.P.C., PsyA.

Friday, April 24, 2015

8:00pm, $15.00

 

We have heard of religious and political leaders experiencing “calls” to take some dramatic action in their lives; individuals such as Moses, the prophets, Jesus, Mohammed, Joan of Arc and many others.

 

What of the call of each of us, sometimes dramatically, often more subtly to be more true to ourselves and commit, or recommit ourselves to making changes. We will reflect upon these possibilities as we consider what Jung meant by the “call of the Self” and by such statements as “His neurosis is his calling” or “Illness as Vocation”.

See bio. under Jungian Reading Seminar

Apr
25
Sat
A Study of C. G. Jung’s AION: Researches Into The Phenomenology Of The Self – Spring Seminar
Apr 25 @ 9:30 am – 12:00 pm

“Only with Christ did a devil enter the world as the real counter part of God, and in early Jewish-Christian circles Satan…was regarded as Christ’s elder brother.” Aion, para. 113.

Scripture (Paul’s letters, 1John, Revelation) warned that there would be no resurrection until after the reign of this evil elder brother. If that apocalyptic imagery is translated into psychological language, it becomes the individual’s task of finding the meaning hidden in everything one has previously not valued – which indeed the evil brother represents. The great challenge of an “end of time” is to survive this adjustment. Jung takes up this difficulty in AION. Very carefully he describes the metaphysical ideas that made the birth of a God-man possible, and how the appearance of the Antichrist – anticipated very shortly after Christ’s death – became consistent with the aeon’s movement into the second fish in the symbol of Pisces. Jung explains how this development was anticipated within Gnostic circles before, during, and after Christ’s life, as well as in the ideas and visions of certain Christians. We are now ending the era of the second fish of Pisces, a time that has brought us face to face with a moral conflict suggested by the opposites of good and evil, of light and dark, in ways that were never thought possible. The final chapter in AION is titled, “The Structure And Dynamics Of The Self.” This is Jung’s vision in schematic form of the self, and we could also say of the creation, as spirit, psyche, animal, and matter. It is in its totality beyond assimilation by human consciousness, but the “end of time” is forcing each of us to take another step in that direction. Required texts: Jung’s AION and Edward Edinger’s The AION Lectures.

James R. Scherer holds a Diploma in Analytical Psychology from the C.G. Jung Institute in Zurich. He is a member of the International Association For Analytical Psychology and the New England Association of Jungian Analysts. He lives with his wife in Hartford, where he has had an analytical practice for 30 years. Including occasional lectures, he has offered continual Saturday seminars on the psychology of C.G.Jung to the CAJP during these years.

Apr
27
Mon
Jungian Reading Seminar: Psychological Types, Vol 6 CW @ Temenos Institute, Westport, CT
Apr 27 @ 11:30 am – 1:00 pm

For the Winter session, the Jungian Reading Group will continue reading Two Essays on Analytical Psychology,

CW vol 7. 

 

Joseph P. Wagenseller, D. Min., N.C. PsyA., L.P.C., L.P. is a Jungian Analyst in private practice in Westport, CT, having practiced for 37 years in Manhattan. He is the Founder and Executive Director of the Temenos Institute, now celebrating its 38th year in Westport and is the past President of the C.G. Jung Institute of New York. Currently he is the Chair of the Board of Trustees of the American Board for the Accreditation of Psychoanalysis. Additionally, Dr. Wagenseller is an Associate Professor in the Graduate Department of Clinical Psychology, Teachers College, Columbia University. He is the author of “The Archetype of Vocation,” in Protestantism and Jungian Analysis, “Spiritual Renewal at the Midlife from a Jungian Perspective”, Journal of Religion and Health (Vol. 37, No 3) and “Individuation, Jung’s Psychological Equivalent of a Spiritual Journey” in the Oxford Handbook of Psychology and Spirituality, ed. Lisa Miller, Ph.D., Oxford University Press, Inc., 2012.

May
1
Fri
Lecture and workshop: The War of the Gods in Addiction: The Psychodynamics of Addiction and Archetypal Evil of Addiction in Fairy Tale, Myth, and Religion @ Smith College
May 1 @ 7:00 pm – May 2 @ 9:39 am

May 1, 2015 Lecture and Saturday Workshop May 2, 2015
David Schoen: The War of the Gods in Addiction: The Psychodynamics of Addiction

Based on the correspondence between Bill W. and Carl Jung, this presentation will describe the development, true nature, and the role of archetypal shadow and evil in the addiction process. We will be presented with an overview of the psychodynamics of addiction, treatment, and recovery. Myth, fairytales, and clinical examples will illustrate the presentation.

May 2, 9am – 1pm Saturday workshop – Archetypal Evil of Addiction in Fairy Tale, Myth, and Religion - (stay tuned for more information).

David Schoen, LCSW, MSSW, Jungian Analyst (IAAP) practices in New Orleans, LA. He was a chemical dependency counselor, is a training analyst with the Inter-Regional Society of Jungian Analysts, and is a poet. He has published internationally and teaches and lectures nationally. 

May
2
Sat
A Study of C. G. Jung’s AION: Researches Into The Phenomenology Of The Self – Spring Seminar
May 2 @ 9:30 am – 12:00 pm

“Only with Christ did a devil enter the world as the real counter part of God, and in early Jewish-Christian circles Satan…was regarded as Christ’s elder brother.” Aion, para. 113.

Scripture (Paul’s letters, 1John, Revelation) warned that there would be no resurrection until after the reign of this evil elder brother. If that apocalyptic imagery is translated into psychological language, it becomes the individual’s task of finding the meaning hidden in everything one has previously not valued – which indeed the evil brother represents. The great challenge of an “end of time” is to survive this adjustment. Jung takes up this difficulty in AION. Very carefully he describes the metaphysical ideas that made the birth of a God-man possible, and how the appearance of the Antichrist – anticipated very shortly after Christ’s death – became consistent with the aeon’s movement into the second fish in the symbol of Pisces. Jung explains how this development was anticipated within Gnostic circles before, during, and after Christ’s life, as well as in the ideas and visions of certain Christians. We are now ending the era of the second fish of Pisces, a time that has brought us face to face with a moral conflict suggested by the opposites of good and evil, of light and dark, in ways that were never thought possible. The final chapter in AION is titled, “The Structure And Dynamics Of The Self.” This is Jung’s vision in schematic form of the self, and we could also say of the creation, as spirit, psyche, animal, and matter. It is in its totality beyond assimilation by human consciousness, but the “end of time” is forcing each of us to take another step in that direction. Required texts: Jung’s AION and Edward Edinger’s The AION Lectures.

James R. Scherer holds a Diploma in Analytical Psychology from the C.G. Jung Institute in Zurich. He is a member of the International Association For Analytical Psychology and the New England Association of Jungian Analysts. He lives with his wife in Hartford, where he has had an analytical practice for 30 years. Including occasional lectures, he has offered continual Saturday seminars on the psychology of C.G.Jung to the CAJP during these years.