Connecticut Association for Jungian Psychology

Welcome to the new website for the Connecticut Association for Jungian Psychology. Our new website features an event calendar which you can search for events, subscribe to updates and easily add events to your calendar.

A nonprofit organization since 1981, CAJP exists in order to provide an opportunity for lectures, study, and discussion of the work of the Swiss psychologist C. G. Jung. CAJP is dedicated to making the methods and insights of Jung more widely available to individuals and professional groups through a program of extended education.

Jan
31
Sat
A Study of C. G. Jung’s AION: Researches Into The Phenomenology Of The Self – Winter Seminar
Jan 31 @ 9:30 am – 12:00 pm

“Only with Christ did a devil enter the world as the real counter part of God, and in early Jewish-Christian circles Satan…was regarded as Christ’s elder brother.” Aion, para. 113.

Scripture (Paul’s letters, 1John, Revelation) warned that there would be no resurrection until after the reign of this evil elder brother. If that apocalyptic imagery is translated into psychological language, it becomes the individual’s task of finding the meaning hidden in everything one has previously not valued – which indeed the evil brother represents. The great challenge of an “end of time” is to survive this adjustment. Jung takes up this difficulty in AION. Very carefully he describes the metaphysical ideas that made the birth of a God-man possible, and how the appearance of the Antichrist – anticipated very shortly after Christ’s death – became consistent with the aeon’s movement into the second fish in the symbol of Pisces. Jung explains how this development was anticipated within Gnostic circles before, during, and after Christ’s life, as well as in the ideas and visions of certain Christians. We are now ending the era of the second fish of Pisces, a time that has brought us face to face with a moral conflict suggested by the opposites of good and evil, of light and dark, in ways that were never thought possible. The final chapter in AION is titled, “The Structure And Dynamics Of The Self.” This is Jung’s vision in schematic form of the self, and we could also say of the creation, as spirit, psyche, animal, and matter. It is in its totality beyond assimilation by human consciousness, but the “end of time” is forcing each of us to take another step in that direction. Required texts: Jung’s AION and Edward Edinger’s The AION Lectures.

James R. Scherer holds a Diploma in Analytical Psychology from the C.G. Jung Institute in Zurich. He is a member of the International Association For Analytical Psychology and the New England Association of Jungian Analysts. He lives with his wife in Hartford, where he has had an analytical practice for 30 years. Including occasional lectures, he has offered continual Saturday seminars on the psychology of C.G.Jung to the CAJP during these years.

Feb
2
Mon
Jungian Reading Seminar: Two Essays on Analytical Psychology, CW vol 7. @ Temenos Institute, Westport, CT
Feb 2 @ 11:30 am – 1:00 pm

For the Winter session, the Jungian Reading Group will continue reading Two Essays on Analytical Psychology,

CW vol 7. 

 

Joseph P. Wagenseller, D. Min., N.C. PsyA., L.P.C., L.P. is a Jungian Analyst in private practice in Westport, CT, having practiced for 37 years in Manhattan. He is the Founder and Executive Director of the Temenos Institute, now celebrating its 38th year in Westport and is the past President of the C.G. Jung Institute of New York. Currently he is the Chair of the Board of Trustees of the American Board for the Accreditation of Psychoanalysis. Additionally, Dr. Wagenseller is an Associate Professor in the Graduate Department of Clinical Psychology, Teachers College, Columbia University. He is the author of “The Archetype of Vocation,” in Protestantism and Jungian Analysis, “Spiritual Renewal at the Midlife from a Jungian Perspective”, Journal of Religion and Health (Vol. 37, No 3) and “Individuation, Jung’s Psychological Equivalent of a Spiritual Journey” in the Oxford Handbook of Psychology and Spirituality, ed. Lisa Miller, Ph.D., Oxford University Press, Inc., 2012.

Feb
6
Fri
Lecture: Contempt/Shame @ Smith College
Feb 6 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Anita Greene: Contempt/Shame

Of all the archetypal affects in us, shame is the most toxic and the most human of all the emotions. Lewis Stewart, who reassessed Jung’s thoughts about affects, believes that contempt and shame are two sides of the same bipolar emotional dynamic whether one is on the giving or receiving end. Both are the response to alienation and rejection.  Extreme contempt exudes a deprecating superiority. Extreme shame obliterates a sense of self-worth and authenticity.  Clinical examples will illustrate how this bipolar dynamic operates in all of us.

Anita Greene, Ph.D., Jungian Analyst (IAAP) and Rubenfeld Synergist is a graduate of the C.G. Jung Institute of New York and teaches at the C.G. Jung Institute of Boston. She has a private practice in Amherst. 

All lectures will take place on the 1st Friday of the month (except for SEPTEMBER and JANUARY) in Seelye Hall Rm# 106 at Smith College at 7:00pm~9:00pm (Directions).

THE PROPHET ARCHETYPE @ Fairfield County Jung Society
Feb 6 @ 8:00 pm – 9:15 pm

LECTURE: THE PROPHET ARCHETYPE

Dr. David Shaver, N.C., PsyA.

Friday, February 6, 2015

8:00pm, $15.00

 

Prophecy is not dissimilar from translation. Both depend upon an unknown manifestation of symbols that require some form of interpretation. These symbols might be as simple as a ghost appearing in a dream or as complex as a many centuries old extinct language script. One is immediately confronted with the possible meaning of the experience. Does that flock of birds portend some future event? What message does the squiggles on those papyrus sheets attempt to convey? For both prophet and translator, interpretation is required to make sense out of seemingly random events or scrawls.

 

Prophecy and translation require two completely different interpretative tools. Translation requires the tool of logic to decipher the squiggles on a page. Prophecy requires the tool of myth to decipher the squiggles in our minds.

 

In this lecture we will explore the process of prophecy. How does the Prophet Archetype work, and what is its relationship to both the Self and the Divine?

 

 

Dr. David Shaver, N.C., PsyA. is a board certified psychoanalyst and philosopher. His most recent book, entitled, “Jung & Remote Viewing”, explains remote viewing from a Jungian perspective. His new book, “The Prophet Archetype”, will be published in the fall of 2015 and will explore the relationship existing between consciousness, the unconscious, and the Divine.

Feb
7
Sat
A Study of C. G. Jung’s AION: Researches Into The Phenomenology Of The Self – Winter Seminar
Feb 7 @ 9:30 am – 12:00 pm

“Only with Christ did a devil enter the world as the real counter part of God, and in early Jewish-Christian circles Satan…was regarded as Christ’s elder brother.” Aion, para. 113.

Scripture (Paul’s letters, 1John, Revelation) warned that there would be no resurrection until after the reign of this evil elder brother. If that apocalyptic imagery is translated into psychological language, it becomes the individual’s task of finding the meaning hidden in everything one has previously not valued – which indeed the evil brother represents. The great challenge of an “end of time” is to survive this adjustment. Jung takes up this difficulty in AION. Very carefully he describes the metaphysical ideas that made the birth of a God-man possible, and how the appearance of the Antichrist – anticipated very shortly after Christ’s death – became consistent with the aeon’s movement into the second fish in the symbol of Pisces. Jung explains how this development was anticipated within Gnostic circles before, during, and after Christ’s life, as well as in the ideas and visions of certain Christians. We are now ending the era of the second fish of Pisces, a time that has brought us face to face with a moral conflict suggested by the opposites of good and evil, of light and dark, in ways that were never thought possible. The final chapter in AION is titled, “The Structure And Dynamics Of The Self.” This is Jung’s vision in schematic form of the self, and we could also say of the creation, as spirit, psyche, animal, and matter. It is in its totality beyond assimilation by human consciousness, but the “end of time” is forcing each of us to take another step in that direction. Required texts: Jung’s AION and Edward Edinger’s The AION Lectures.

James R. Scherer holds a Diploma in Analytical Psychology from the C.G. Jung Institute in Zurich. He is a member of the International Association For Analytical Psychology and the New England Association of Jungian Analysts. He lives with his wife in Hartford, where he has had an analytical practice for 30 years. Including occasional lectures, he has offered continual Saturday seminars on the psychology of C.G.Jung to the CAJP during these years.

Feb
9
Mon
Jungian Reading Seminar: Two Essays on Analytical Psychology, CW vol 7. @ Temenos Institute, Westport, CT
Feb 9 @ 11:30 am – 1:00 pm

For the Winter session, the Jungian Reading Group will continue reading Two Essays on Analytical Psychology,

CW vol 7. 

 

Joseph P. Wagenseller, D. Min., N.C. PsyA., L.P.C., L.P. is a Jungian Analyst in private practice in Westport, CT, having practiced for 37 years in Manhattan. He is the Founder and Executive Director of the Temenos Institute, now celebrating its 38th year in Westport and is the past President of the C.G. Jung Institute of New York. Currently he is the Chair of the Board of Trustees of the American Board for the Accreditation of Psychoanalysis. Additionally, Dr. Wagenseller is an Associate Professor in the Graduate Department of Clinical Psychology, Teachers College, Columbia University. He is the author of “The Archetype of Vocation,” in Protestantism and Jungian Analysis, “Spiritual Renewal at the Midlife from a Jungian Perspective”, Journal of Religion and Health (Vol. 37, No 3) and “Individuation, Jung’s Psychological Equivalent of a Spiritual Journey” in the Oxford Handbook of Psychology and Spirituality, ed. Lisa Miller, Ph.D., Oxford University Press, Inc., 2012.

Feb
14
Sat
A Study of C. G. Jung’s AION: Researches Into The Phenomenology Of The Self – Winter Seminar
Feb 14 @ 9:30 am – 12:00 pm

“Only with Christ did a devil enter the world as the real counter part of God, and in early Jewish-Christian circles Satan…was regarded as Christ’s elder brother.” Aion, para. 113.

Scripture (Paul’s letters, 1John, Revelation) warned that there would be no resurrection until after the reign of this evil elder brother. If that apocalyptic imagery is translated into psychological language, it becomes the individual’s task of finding the meaning hidden in everything one has previously not valued – which indeed the evil brother represents. The great challenge of an “end of time” is to survive this adjustment. Jung takes up this difficulty in AION. Very carefully he describes the metaphysical ideas that made the birth of a God-man possible, and how the appearance of the Antichrist – anticipated very shortly after Christ’s death – became consistent with the aeon’s movement into the second fish in the symbol of Pisces. Jung explains how this development was anticipated within Gnostic circles before, during, and after Christ’s life, as well as in the ideas and visions of certain Christians. We are now ending the era of the second fish of Pisces, a time that has brought us face to face with a moral conflict suggested by the opposites of good and evil, of light and dark, in ways that were never thought possible. The final chapter in AION is titled, “The Structure And Dynamics Of The Self.” This is Jung’s vision in schematic form of the self, and we could also say of the creation, as spirit, psyche, animal, and matter. It is in its totality beyond assimilation by human consciousness, but the “end of time” is forcing each of us to take another step in that direction. Required texts: Jung’s AION and Edward Edinger’s The AION Lectures.

James R. Scherer holds a Diploma in Analytical Psychology from the C.G. Jung Institute in Zurich. He is a member of the International Association For Analytical Psychology and the New England Association of Jungian Analysts. He lives with his wife in Hartford, where he has had an analytical practice for 30 years. Including occasional lectures, he has offered continual Saturday seminars on the psychology of C.G.Jung to the CAJP during these years.

Feb
16
Mon
Jungian Reading Seminar: Two Essays on Analytical Psychology, CW vol 7. @ Temenos Institute, Westport, CT
Feb 16 @ 11:30 am – 1:00 pm

For the Winter session, the Jungian Reading Group will continue reading Two Essays on Analytical Psychology,

CW vol 7. 

 

Joseph P. Wagenseller, D. Min., N.C. PsyA., L.P.C., L.P. is a Jungian Analyst in private practice in Westport, CT, having practiced for 37 years in Manhattan. He is the Founder and Executive Director of the Temenos Institute, now celebrating its 38th year in Westport and is the past President of the C.G. Jung Institute of New York. Currently he is the Chair of the Board of Trustees of the American Board for the Accreditation of Psychoanalysis. Additionally, Dr. Wagenseller is an Associate Professor in the Graduate Department of Clinical Psychology, Teachers College, Columbia University. He is the author of “The Archetype of Vocation,” in Protestantism and Jungian Analysis, “Spiritual Renewal at the Midlife from a Jungian Perspective”, Journal of Religion and Health (Vol. 37, No 3) and “Individuation, Jung’s Psychological Equivalent of a Spiritual Journey” in the Oxford Handbook of Psychology and Spirituality, ed. Lisa Miller, Ph.D., Oxford University Press, Inc., 2012.

Feb
20
Fri
LECTURE: THE MEDITATIVE APPROACH TO EMOTIONS @ Temenos Institute
Feb 20 @ 8:00 pm – 9:15 pm

LECTURE: THE MEDITATIVE APPROACH TO EMOTIONS

Richard Sussman, M.S.W., C.S.W.

Friday, February 20, 2015

8:00pm, $15.00

The meditative approach to emotions teaches us to relate to problematic emotions such as anxiety, depression, fear or anger in a purely experiential way. Unlike psychological approaches to working with emotions, the meditative approach is not concerned with the content, meaning, or psychological structures underlying the emotions. Rather it facilitates us opening directly to the pure energy contained within them while maintaining our centeredness despite their intensity.

 

By learning to cut through our judgments and reactions to them, the emotions are no longer energized and exaggerated. This significantly reduces the resistance to fully experiencing them. And as they are fully experienced, they soon transmute or actually dissipate since they are only temporary forms of energetic expression having no actual solid, fixed existence. What’s left in their stead is a sense of openness, aliveness, or positivity.

 

This presentation will introduce the participants to some of the techniques for achieving these healing possibilities.

Richard Sussman, M.S.W., C.S.W. is a psychotherapist practicing in New York and in Connecticut who has worked for many years with both individuals and couples. He is a licensed transpersonal psychotherapist and clinical social worker specializing in the integration of Western psychology and Eastern spiritual traditions. He has served as the Co-Director of the New Haven Center for Gestalt Therapy, and was a core faculty

member of the Gestalt Therapy Center in New York, where he trained and supervised professional practitioners.

 

Feb
21
Sat
A Study of C. G. Jung’s AION: Researches Into The Phenomenology Of The Self – Winter Seminar
Feb 21 @ 9:30 am – 12:00 pm

“Only with Christ did a devil enter the world as the real counter part of God, and in early Jewish-Christian circles Satan…was regarded as Christ’s elder brother.” Aion, para. 113.

Scripture (Paul’s letters, 1John, Revelation) warned that there would be no resurrection until after the reign of this evil elder brother. If that apocalyptic imagery is translated into psychological language, it becomes the individual’s task of finding the meaning hidden in everything one has previously not valued – which indeed the evil brother represents. The great challenge of an “end of time” is to survive this adjustment. Jung takes up this difficulty in AION. Very carefully he describes the metaphysical ideas that made the birth of a God-man possible, and how the appearance of the Antichrist – anticipated very shortly after Christ’s death – became consistent with the aeon’s movement into the second fish in the symbol of Pisces. Jung explains how this development was anticipated within Gnostic circles before, during, and after Christ’s life, as well as in the ideas and visions of certain Christians. We are now ending the era of the second fish of Pisces, a time that has brought us face to face with a moral conflict suggested by the opposites of good and evil, of light and dark, in ways that were never thought possible. The final chapter in AION is titled, “The Structure And Dynamics Of The Self.” This is Jung’s vision in schematic form of the self, and we could also say of the creation, as spirit, psyche, animal, and matter. It is in its totality beyond assimilation by human consciousness, but the “end of time” is forcing each of us to take another step in that direction. Required texts: Jung’s AION and Edward Edinger’s The AION Lectures.

James R. Scherer holds a Diploma in Analytical Psychology from the C.G. Jung Institute in Zurich. He is a member of the International Association For Analytical Psychology and the New England Association of Jungian Analysts. He lives with his wife in Hartford, where he has had an analytical practice for 30 years. Including occasional lectures, he has offered continual Saturday seminars on the psychology of C.G.Jung to the CAJP during these years.